About Us

Board of Directors

 

2014 AGM

 

This year’s AGM gave an opportunity for the members to vote in 2 directors to the board. There were three members nominated and a vote was held. We had incumbent Jim McClelland voted in for his second term and member Bryan Allan voted in for his first opportunity to sit on the board.

With these two positions open, a void had to be filled in the Vice Presidents position. The members on the newly filled board were unanimous in appointing Dennis Quintilio as the new Vice President. 

 

 

The Rocky Mountain Wilderness Society was founded on the principal of serving as advocates for the Rocky Mountains and surrounding crown lands. All of our board members are volunteers.

President: Ken Groat       

Vice President: Dennis Quintilio           

Secretary/Treasurer.: Jim McClelland  

Traditions Director: Lyle Moberly   

Business Representative: Brian Bildson

Director: Cliff Henderson

Director: Bryan Allan

 

Some of our society's goals are enhancing the trail systems in the Wilderness Parks to make them safer for all users whether it be for mountain bikers, hikers or horse pack trips. Clean up all camp grounds and pack out garbage that has been left behind by other users over the years, and leave a supply of fire wood for the next group to help make their stay a little more enjoyable. All the trails that we do enhancement on will be GPS'd with hopes in the future of having a map with all GPS trails on it.

 

 

President

 

 

Ken Groat 

 

 

Ken was raised in the mountains of Brule and followed his passion of working with horses by spending a number of years guiding hunters in Alberta, British Columbia and the North West Territories. He is a member of the fifth generation of a long line of Mountain people who have traveled, hunted and trapped through the Athabasca Valley and the east slopes of the Rocky Mountains. Ken has traveled many of the trails from the Smokey to the Red Deer River. One of his pet peeves is traveling with pack outfits through back country trails that are in dire need of good maintenance. A well maintained trail makes for safer, more enjoyable trips for all users whether it be on horses, mountain bikes or hiking.

 

In the past Ken has served as a Credit Union Director for a number of years, including several terms as Chairman of the Board. As well he chaired numerous rodeo committee meetings for the Yellowhead Agricultural Society in Edson. Ken has volunteered as Master of Ceremonies at the Brule Rodeo for over 40 years.

 

Ken is a member of the Upper Athabasca Valley Elders’ Council. He is currently involved as liaison (communications) between the Council and Jasper National Park. Ken was Vice President of the Willmore Wilderness Foundation Board previous to accepting his current position as President of the Rocky Mountains Wilderness Society.

 

With his strong background and passion for the back country, Ken will help lead this Society through its mission and vision by making the trails systems safer for all users. Ken is looking forward to working with the membership and fellow back country users in the future.

 

 

 

 

Vice President

 

 

Dennis Quintilio

 

Dennis worked as a forester throughout Alberta and knew many of the old time rangers that patrolled the backcountry and one of their primary duties was to build and maintain horse trails. These trails in the early days were important for trapping, fire suppression and timber assessment, and usually connected Forest Service cabins located on good grassy meadows. Some of these trails are disappearing mostly as a result of forest succession, floods and fires.

 

The Quintilio family has been travelling throughout Alberta with our pack outfit for forty three years and we now have grandchildren on our summer trips. Favorite locations include Cypress Hills and the Upper Oldman River area in southern Alberta, the Clearwater and Blackstone Rivers in central Alberta, the south and north boundary trails in Jasper National Park, and most of all the Wilmore Wilderness Park.

 

We are interested in contributing to the restoration and maintenance of the historic trails and traditional horseback travel in Alberta’s Rocky Mountain Wilderness.

 

 

 

Secretary/Treasure

 

  

Jim McClelland

 

 Jim was born and raised on the southern outskirts of Edmonton and from an early age had a close association with the outdoors. He graduated from the University of Alberta with a Bsc in zoology in 1969 and a Law degree in 1972. He moved to Hinton, Alberta in 1984 and currently is the Senior partner of Johnson McClelland. He has traveled extensively by horseback in many of the wilderness areas of Alberta and primarily in the Willmore Wilderness Park. He is currently vice president of the Hinton Local of the Alberta Trappers Association and also is a partner in a trapline located partially in the Willmore Wilderness Park. His Background and passion for maintaining the integrity and traditional use of all wilderness areas will provide a valuable asset to the Society.

 

 

 

Director

 

 

 Cliff Henderson

 

The Henderson family where early pioneers in Alberta and settled in Ponoka in 1903 where they homesteaded and carried a mix farming operation until the 1990s.

 

Cliff left Ponoka in the early 60’s and worked for the Alberta Forest Service retiring in 2008 and returned to Ponoka.   The Forest Service had a culture of history and there was great pride in the old time Forest Rangers that protected our precious back country.   They patrolled and protected the landscape following many of the historic trade trails and established many cabins. These cabins are very important landmarks in our back country history and as such deserve attention and protection.

 

Cliff was very honoured to being awarded an Honorary Chief, Chief Sorrel Horse, by the Peigan’s Chief Crowshoe and Elders. As wellCliff has served on many boards and committees and looks forward to serving this society to preserve history for future generations.

 

 

 

Director

  

Bryan Allan 
 
Bryan always had a love for the wilderness and the lifestyle it afforded.  Born and raised in Edmonton he moved to the Hinton area in 1970.  After his school years were finished, he was employed as a Forester with the forest Industry within the Woodland’s Departments right up to his retirement in 2003.
 
A strong urge to explore old trails and owning a small outfit, has allowed him to travel much of the Eastern Slope Watershed, from Sheep Creek northwest of Grande Cache to the Brazeau.  He believes that trail maintenance is vital for the preservation and integrity of the Alberta Mountain Regions.  Bryan has travelled with RMWS’s trail clearing crew the first two seasons of the Societies existence.
 
As well as being an avid trapper Bryan is a member of the Alberta Trapper’s Association and has recently served as a director with the Hinton Trapper Local.
 
With Bryan’s dedication and desire to see Alberta’s mountain region experienced in a meaningful manner he is a huge assed to the board of the RMWS as they lead the Society through its growing years.
 
 

Director/Accountant and More...

 

Virginia Stafford

 

 

Living in diverse landscapes her whole life Virginia has a deep appreciation for their special uniqueness.  Early years travelling Australia with her family then middle years in the Rockies of the Crowsnest Pass and jungles of Papua New Guinea then back to Canada to Victoria and Peace River.  Raising her family on the Sunshine Coast of BC then North to Mackenzie before spending 17 years in Hinton have given her an awareness and respect of how varied the ecosystems and geographical atmospheres are within the world’s wilderness areas.  Recently moved to the Okanagan she now has another change in her backyard to learn about.

As a designated professional accountant Virginia owned and managed a public accounting firm in Hinton until 2013.  After selling her practice she settled into the area and enjoyed learning more about the backcountry with the support of the locals who know it well.  With the best of instruction she rode out into yonder and explored and appreciated the pristine and natural beauty the wild of the back country offers.  In the words of Roderick Nash (known for his work as a wilderness historian) she discovered “On one hand, “wilderness’ is inhospitable, alien, mysterious, and somewhat threatening.  On the other, beautiful, friendly, and capable of elevating and delighting us.”  This drawing card is what makes the wild so attractive and the best mate to have a relationship with! 

Wanting to see opportunities continue to future generations to enjoy and explore the Rocky Mountain Wilderness as she has done, Virginia is looking forward to helping assist the Society to protect,  restore and maintain the historic trails for all users in the wilderness parks of Alberta. 

Virginia is currently doing the bookkeeping and preparing year-end financial statements for the members as well as maintaining the membership roster.  Other administrative duties as they arise as well.  However, in addition to this background work she looks forward to helping on the trails in any way she can.  

 

 

 

Director

 

Richard Aarsen

 

Richard was born and raised in Central Alberta. He moved to Neerlandia where he got married and raised his children on a wage that came from farming, carpentry, logging, trapping and guiding. He has always had a passion for the outdoors and over his life has been able to enjoy much of Canada’s wilderness.

 

The eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains are an especially beautiful place, specifically Willmore Wilderness Park. I have spent some of my best times riding, hiking and hunting in this spectacular part of Alberta. There are many trails to be ridden and discovered yet and am excited to be helping the Rocky Mountain Wilderness Society achieve their goals in preserving and enhancing this beautiful area.